Filtering by: Public Talks

The Centennial of the May Fourth Movement and the Birth of Modern China: Lecture and Discussion
May
4
2:00 PM14:00

The Centennial of the May Fourth Movement and the Birth of Modern China: Lecture and Discussion

A century ago, within the humble walls of a red brick building just to the east of the Forbidden City, an intellectual revolution was underway. Beijing was ground zero for the May Fourth/New Culture Movement. Iconoclastic firebrands like Chen Duxiu were publishing new magazines. Young intellectuals like Hu Shi were returning from abroad with new ideas about philosophy, language, and history. The librarian Li Dazhao spent his time writing essays on Bolshevism and revolutionary change. Even his intern, a chubby kid recently arrived from Hunan, would go on to play a major role in China's turbulent 20th century. Overseeing it all was Cai Yuanpei, classically trained and German-educated, who changed the academic climate at Peking University and sowed the seeds of intellectual change.

We'll meet these famous figures and the New Culture Movement in a special lecture and discussion commemorating the May 4th Movement. Why was the May Fourth Era so important? Why was it such an intellectual dynamic period? How did the May Fourth Demonstrations of 1919 change the intellectual climate and set the stages for the political divisions which would soon tear China apart?

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The Awkward Position of Missionaries in Chinese History: A Talk and Discussion
Mar
2
2:00 PM14:00

The Awkward Position of Missionaries in Chinese History: A Talk and Discussion

From the time of Matteo Ricci and the Jesuit missions of the 16th century, missionaries have played an important role in Chinese history. By the 19th century, the missionary promised both new forms of educational and hygienic modernity while also being seen by the people as a possible threat to the established order in this world and beyond. How did the people of late imperial China perceive missionaries?

In 1870, tales of kidnapping and sorcery swirled around the city of Tianjin. The local magistrate wants to investigate the charges of witchcraft being made against a group of Catholic nuns. The French consul insists the missionaries are protected from prosecution by treaties signed with the Chinese government. In the middle is a hapless Manchu official unable to keep the peace. On June 21, 1870, the city of Tianjin exploded into a day of rage and violence which shocked the world and revealed the perilous position of missionaries in 19th century China.

Join writer, historian, and storyteller Jeremiah Jenne for this talk and discussion about the role missionaries played in Chinese history.

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Manchus in the Palace: Myths, Legends, and History at the Forbidden City
Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Manchus in the Palace: Myths, Legends, and History at the Forbidden City

Interested in learning more about the Forbidden City but prefer to avoid the crowds and the lines? History guy Jeremiah Jenne brings the best of his Forbidden City walk and talk to the comfortable confines of The Hutong. Learn about the backstory of Beijing as an imperial capital and the construction of the Forbidden City. We’ll explore the history of the emperors, eunuchs, officials, and concubines who lived and worked there. We’ll discuss the differences between Ming and Qing, the legacy of the Manchus, and the past, present, and future efforts to preserve Beijing’s most famous palace. Jeremiah will also share his favorite travel hacks for visiting the palace!

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Send Lawyers, Guns, and Money: A Hacked History of the Opium War
Apr
21
2:00 PM14:00

Send Lawyers, Guns, and Money: A Hacked History of the Opium War

The Opium Wars mark the beginning of China's "Century of Humiliation" and the beginning of China's modern era in school textbooks in the PRC. What caused the war? Was it really all about protecting Queen Victoria's good name as the world's largest narco-baron? How are the wars remembered today and what does this mean for how China sees the world in the 21st century. This talk is an informative and entertaining look at the Opium Wars and what it means for people living and working in China today.

Join writer, historian, and storyteller Jeremiah Jenne for this talk and discussion about the role missionaries played in Chinese history.

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